Posts Tagged adventure

Letting Go to Let Something Better In


The Easiest and the Hardest Step in Breaking Out of Old Patterns

It’s one of the most frightening passages life confronts us with. What we’ve been doing doesn’t work anymore. We’ve come to a fork in the road. One fork leads to the known. The other one leads to the unknown.

I had spent my entire career working in a family business. My father and my uncle built the business. They passed away, leaving the next generation in charge. My father and uncle expected me and my two cousins to continue where they left off. In theory, my cousins and I had the education and the experience to handle the transition seamlessly. Except we didn’t share a vision for the future, and I frankly couldn’t stand one of my cousins. By the way, I wasn’t alone in my antipathy towards him.

After several futile attempts to carry on as expected, I saw the handwriting on the wall. I did not foresee the business flourishing with the three of us at the helm. I decided to sell my share of the business to my cousins. It was one of the hardest decisions I ever had to make.

Up until this fork in the road, my life had been structured from the outside in. I had done what I was expected to do. Now, it was up to me to structure my life from the inside out.

I have found this wise old saying to be very true. “When one door closes, another opens.”  To express it another way, letting go of one thing leaves room for another. The scary part of navigating this passage is enduring the empty space left behind in the wake of releasing the known. We are normally left with only a tiny kernel of an idea. A faint voice whispers insistently to our heart and mind.  It can be an annoying voice because it offers no concrete plan of action. We must have the courage to take the first step.

I had always dreamed of writing fiction. From a solid background in marketing communications, I began writing short stories in my forties. While still employed in the family business, I took online courses in screenwriting at UCLA. I learned the basics of character development, drama and conflict, and plotting. After selling my share of the business, I now had the time and the freedom to initiate the final stage of the process: writing novels.

For starters, it became a very lonely process. I was accustomed to interfacing with all kinds of people in business. Now, except for a few friends, wife, daughter, and mother-in-law, I was completely alone. Doubts and fears constantly assaulted me. I figured real novelists enjoyed their solitude. I kept thinking, real novelists are self- sufficient artists. They can take or leave people. All they need are their cats or dogs. Maybe this is true. Maybe not. I haven’t had the chance to sit down with a real novelist to have this conversation. All I know is I’ve managed to write three good screenplays and three good novels since taking the fork in the road that leads to the unknown.

There are certainly ups and downs mucking about in the unknown. I have to say, though, that it’s more interesting and rewarding than steady doses of the known. It’s actually fun to travel back and forth between the worlds of the unknown and the known. (I just have to be careful not to spend too much time stuck in the known).

Let’s take writing this article to illustrate my point. When I began, I only had a vague idea of what it would be about. I did, however, have the definite intention of writing something that would be of interest and benefit to you and me. So, what is my point? Okay, here it is: have the courage to adventure into the unknown and trust the skills you know, deep down, that you have. Nobody gets rich, creates anything meaningful, or finds a deeper source of happiness following the crowd.

David Gittlin has written three feature length screenplays, produced two short films, and published three novels. Before quitting his day job, he spent more than thirty years as a marketing director building expertise in advertising, copy writing, corporate communications, collateral sales materials, website content/design and online marketing.

 

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I’d Like to Meet Jack Reacher


You probably know Jack Reacher from the movies, but have you ever met him on the printed page?

I stumbled upon the Jack Reacher novels while looking for a good book to read in a Palm Beach sundries shop.  As a science fiction/adventure/thriller fan, I’m surprised it took me so long to discover the Reacher novels and their brilliant author, Lee Child.

In the character of Jack Reacher, Child has created one of the most compelling protagonists in contemporary fiction.  First of all, he doesn’t look anything like Tom Cruise.  Cruise is a shrimp in comparison to the character described in the novels.  Reacher is an ex-Army Military Policeman, standing six feet five inches tall, in top physical condition, with hands as big as sledgehammers.  He’s a decent looking guy, but nothing to write home about, aside from his size.

Something in Reacher’s past keeps him riding buses and drifting from town to town in search of something.  That something usually turns out to be someone in need of help.  Reacher’s involvement with the something always leads to mounting trouble and extreme danger.

While Jack Reacher is a tough guy who can stand up to six guys at once, he’s also a good Samaritan.  In The Midnight Line, the first novel I had the pleasure of reading, Reacher takes an aimless stroll past a pawn shop in a small Midwestern town.  In the window, he sees a West Point class ring from 2005.  It’s tiny; a woman cadet’s graduation present to herself.  Why would she give it up?  Reacher is a West Pointer too, and he knows what she went through to get it.

Reacher tracks the ring back to its owner, step by step, down a criminal trail leading west into the deserted wilds of Wyoming.  All he wants is to find the woman.  If she’s OK, he’ll walk away. If she’s not, he’ll stop at nothing until the situation is rectified.

I found The Midnight Line to be an engrossing tale enriched with interesting, believable characters.  The story kept me absorbed all the way through to its satisfying ending.  I’ve followed up with Child’s penultimate book in the series, Past Tense.  It’s a unique story that begins a bit slowly with Jack Reacher visiting a small town to trace his roots.  The story veers off in an unusual subplot that unfolds at a remote hotel and merges with the main plot in an explosive, thrilling climax.

The prose and dialogue in both books flow in staccato, muscular sentences, much like Reacher’s speech pattern.  It’s cool, once you get used to it. Occasionally, the characters sound too much alike, with Child’s hyper intelligent voice seeping through.  This is a minor gripe.  I find Child’s prose eminently readable, enjoyable, and interesting.  The author packs his story with enlightening background information which relates directly to the story.  I heartily recommend the Reacher series to action/adventure/mystery fans everywhere.

After reading both novels, I’m left wondering what drives Jack Reacher?  It’s not money.  He’s comfortable living off his Army pension.  While his life is lonely, he isn’t looking for love.  Women are attracted to him, but he’s only capable of forming brief relationships.  In Midnight Line, one of the women Reacher is helping wants to bed him.  She’s a beautiful twin-sister to the woman they are searching for.  She’s unhappily married to an emotionally distant husband.  Reacher could easily rationalize having sex with her, but he won’t do it.  He has integrity.  He has a code of honor, maybe resulting from his military background, but he’s hardly a goody-goody.  Reacher is not afraid to break the rules or think outside of the box when confronted with difficult situations.  He’s resourceful, observant, and downright ingenious at times.  He’s a leader, in a lone-wolf, non-conformist sort of way.

Reacher may sound like a big cliche, but somehow, Lee Child breathes life into the guy.  He may be strong, but he’s deeply wounded emotionally.  He doesn’t fit in, and he can’t settle down.  But unlike so many contemporary protagonists, he isn’t haunted by his past.  He doesn’t spend a single minute feeling sorry for himself.  He’d rather get on with his life, help someone else, solve a mystery, or whatever he does in the books I haven’t read yet.  Granted, there’s a strong tendency towards avoidance going on inside this man, but it’s hard to hold it against him.

Reacher is street smart and highly intelligent.  He’s seen too much of the dark side of human nature, but it hasn’t made him cynical.  His attitude is always upbeat.  He communicates with tongue-in-check humor occasionally laced with irony.  He doesn’t judge.  He acts and reacts, sometimes with tact and diplomacy, sometimes with blunt force.  Yet, he never looks for a fight.  To get what he wants, Reacher always tries diplomacy and straight-forward-honestly first.  If the people he’s dealing with refuse to listen to reason, they usually wind up in various stages of disrepair when they choose violence as a solution.

So, what drives Jack Reacher?  I don’t know.  Maybe I’ll find out if I read more of his books.  Maybe not.  For sure, I’d like to sit down and have a long chat with this intriguing fellow.  I know this much, if nothing else: it’s hard not to like Jack Reacher, and I can’t wait to tag along with him on his next adventure.

David Gittlin has written three feature length screenplays, produced two short films, and published three novels.  Before quitting his day job, he spent more than thirty years as a marketing director building expertise in advertising, copy writing, corporate communications, collateral sales materials, website content/design and online marketing.   For more information, please visit www.davidgittlin.com

 

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Micromium Has Gone Audio


MICROMIUM WEB RES 4

Copyright 2018 David Gittlin

My third novel, Micromium: Clean Energy from Mars, is now available as an Audio Book on Audible.comAmazon.com and iTunes.

It was great fun doing the project. I want to give a shout out to my writer/musician friend, Joe Canzano, for inspiring me to do the project.  Also, thanks to my narrator, Caitlin Willis Frizzel, for doing an excellent job of bringing my characters to life.

Special Offer: Get a FREE Micromium audio book by following these easy steps: Go to the Micromium page on Audible by clicking https://tinyurl.com/yar5hmsk. Listen to the five minute sample (optional). If you like what you hear, contact me through my website at www.davidgittlin.com. The first ten people who contact me will receive a promo code and instructions for downloading a free Micromium audio book. Be sure to send me your email so I can send you the code and instructions. I will NOT use your email to send offers or promotions. I DO NOT keep email lists for promotion. (I hate spam, and I’m sure you do, too).

Synopsis: The year is 2038. Earth’s biosphere is on the brink of destruction from the effects of global warming and pollution. The World Energy Council has awarded a lucrative contract to a major US corporation to mine a precious ore discovered by the first manned mission to land on Mars.  One kilo of Micromium can power a large city for a year without environmental side effects.  A few grains of the ore can fuel a car for a year or longer.  Micromium promises to provide clean energy to a thirsty planet far into the future.

When two people die in a mining accident on Mars, the World Energy Council sends Commander Logan Marchant and a crack team of astronaut specialists to investigate.

Confronted with a lack of cooperation from the mining colonists, the investigation is further complicated by Logan’s growing attraction to the team’s beautiful and brainy geologist.  While tensions and tempers rise, Logan and the audit team make one shocking discovery after another, until the investigation leads them into mortal danger, and ultimately, to a surprising conclusion.

“A fun science-fiction thriller with both unique and familiar concepts, MICROMIUM delivers a satisfying story with memorable characters you don’t mind spending time alone with on a desolate planet, millions of miles from Earth.”

Joshua M. Patton, IndieReader.com

“Versatile in its imagery, characters, and storyline, Micromium: Clean Energy from Mars will take readers on a journey throughout the galaxy. With scenes ranging from intense and scary to action-packed and awesome, the novel will never cease to wow readers. The pages of this easy-read will fly through readers’ hands while its story and characters remain in readers’ minds.”

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars, bookreviewdirectory.com

David Gittlin has written three feature length screenplays, produced two short films, and published three novels.  Before quiting his day job, he spent more than thirty years as a marketing director building expertise in advertising, copy writing, corporate communications, collateral sales materials, website content/design and online marketing.   For more information, please visit www.davidgittlin.com

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Micromium Gets Some Love From Indie Reader


MICROMIUM WEB RES 2

Verdict: A fun science-fiction thriller with both unique and familiar concepts, MICROMIUM delivers a satisfying story with memorable characters you don’t mind
spending time alone with on a desolate planet, millions of miles from Earth.

MICROMIUM by David Gittlin is a delightful science-fiction adventure set in a near-future where a possible clean energy source from Mars has captured humanity’s hope. A team of scientists travel to the red planet to perform an audit of the privately run mining operation. The team does their job a little too well, uncovering a secret that the company was desperate to keep hidden.

The story that unfolds in this novella is very compelling and carries the reader along with a fast-paced tale that isn’t difficult to follow. The characters are at their most interesting when they are working to solve the central problem of the book and working together as a team. When major twists are thrown their way, readers are eager to follow along with the team wherever they’re headed. There is drama and excitement, and all of it serves the larger story.

The characters’ stories are full of gripping drama and very real stakes. In sci-fi, it can be difficult to cut your characters off from the help they might need in a technologically-advanced society. Stuck on a planet millions of miles from that help, where the very atmosphere is deadly, solves that problem in a very real way. Like other recent stories focused on the red planet, the threat of being stranded there is ever-present, adding another layer of stakes to an already high-tension story.

Like all good science fiction, MICROMIUM features both a specific narrative that is enthralling and a larger universe that seems ripe for future storytelling. Many writers fall prey to focusing more on the latter element than providing a resolution for the former that is both complete and satisfying. Gittlin does not. The story he sets out to tell is resolved very clearly, but how that ending unfolds opens the possibility for more stories about both these characters and the world in which they live. Readers are left wanting more, but not because the story that drew them into the book was left unfinished.

Joshua Patton–Indie Reader

 

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